CI/CD using Jenkins and Docker

Several years ago I discovered how useful Docker might be for CI/CD using Jenkins. Now, time arrived to share that with you. You may say that it’s old news because there are a lot of new tools and technologies enabling CI/CD other than Jenkins. Nevertheless, many companies still do CI/CD using Jenkins. Additionally, they might use Docker for packaging the applications. Do their Jenkins instances run in Docker as well? Preferably, they do. If you feel it’s too much, don’t worry 🙂 I’ll showcase CI/CD of web app using Docker and Jenkins. Keep reading to find out more details 🙂

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Adding Google analytics to WordPress website

So you created your wonderful WordPress website and would like to track its usage 🙂 Of course, adding Google analytics seems like an obvious option. Firstly, you created Google Analytics account. What’s next? Obviously, you can install additional WordPress plugins to enable it on your website. However, more plugins may slow your website down. You may wonder how to add Google Analytics support to WordPress website without a plugin. In addition, adding Google analytics to any website requires some effort to make it GDPR-compliant. What exact steps you should take to achieve that? Are there any privacy-friendly and lightweight Google Analytics alternatives which are fully GDPR-compliant? Keep reading to find out answers to all these questions 🙂

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Messed up your git history? Use git merge squash to clean it.

Introduction

Have you ever found yourself in a situation when you made a lot of commits with messages like fix, more fixes in the dev branch? I did. It could have been that you stayed truthful to keeping git commits as small as possible. However, this rule applies only if your small commits were fully complete and tested. Let’s be honest, such commits most probably weren’t. Apparently, you just wanted to finish this never-ending task just to get it done.

Eventually, if you are lucky and patient enough, all these fixes lead to some working code. Would you merge it master? You could, but all these commits won’t pass code review. They shouldn’t, as this would make main branch messy as well. No one will be willing to understand these commits. Moreover, no one should ever revert to these commits, because they don’t represent a stable state in a repository history. So, what should we do?

Luckily, git merge --squash is the magic command which will help us to “squash” all these commits into one. The one we will merge to main branch

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